Our team of specialists and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you. Or, for a more comprehensive search of our entire Web site, enter your term(s) in the search bar provided.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.


 


 

What is a Podiatrist?

When To Call a Doctor

Foot Anatomy

Foot Problems

General Statistics

Achilles Problems

Achilles Tendonitis |Peroneal Tendon Dislocation/Dysfunction | Xanthomas of the Achilles Tendon

Ankle Problems

Ankle SprainChronic Lateral Ankle Pain | Osteochondritis

Arch and Ball Problems

CapsulitisFlat Feet Metatarsalgia (foot pain in ball)Plantar Fibromas (lumps in the arch of the foot) | Sesamoiditis

Common Foot Injuries

Ankle Sprain Injuries | Broken Ankle | Fractures | Osteochondritis (stiff ankle)Osteochondromas |Shin Splints | Sports Injuries

Deformities

Amniotic Band Syndrome | Bunions | Claw ToeClubfootDysplasia (Epiphysealis Hemimelica) | Enchondroma | Flat FeetGordon Syndrome | Haglund's Deformity | Hallux Limitus (Stiff Big Toe Joint)Hallux Rigidus (Stiff Big Toe) | Hallux VarusHammertoesJackson-Weiss SyndromeMallet ToesMetatarsalgia |Osteomyelitis (Bone Infections)Overlapping or Underlapping ToesPeroneal Tendon Dislocation/DysfunctionPosterior Tibial Tendon DysfunctionSesamoiditisSpurs | Tarsal Coalition

Diabetes and Your Feet

Diseases of the Foot

Arthritis | Cancer | Charcot Foot | Freiberg's Disease | Gout | Kaposi's Sarcoma | Kohler's Disease | Maffucci's SyndromeOllier's DiseaseRaynaud's Disease | Seiver's Disease

Fungus Problems

Common Fungal Problems | Athlete's Foot (Tinea Pedis) | Fungal Nails

Heel Problems

Haglund's Deformity | Heel Callus | Heel Fissures | Plantar Fasciitis (heel spur)

Nail Problems

Black Toenails | Ingrown Toenails| Nail Fungus

Skin Problems

Allergies | Athlete's Foot (tinea pedis) | Blisters| Burning Feet | Calluses | Corns | Cysts | Frostbite | Fungus | Gangrene | Lesions | Psoriasis | Smelly Feet and Foot Odor | Swelling | Ulcers | Warts

Toe Problems

Bunions | Claw Toe | Digital Deformity | Hallux Limitus (stiff big toe joint)Hallux Rigidis (rigid big toe)Hallux Varus | Hammertoes | Intoeing | Overlapping, Underlapping Toes | Subungal Exotosis (bone spur under toenail) | Turf Toe

Vascular/Nerve Problems

Acrocyanosis | Alcoholic Neuropathy | Chilblains (cold feet) | Erythromelalgia | Ischemic Foot | Neuroma | Spasms | Venous Stasis

 

 

Overview of Foot and Ankle Problems

Basic Foot Care Guidelines

Medical Care

Diagnostic Procedures

Computed Tomography | MRI | Ultrasound | X-Rays

Orthotics

Pain Management

General Information and Tips | Pain Management for Specific Conditions

Surgical Procedures

General Information | Achilles Surgery | Ankle Surgery | Arthritis Surgery | Arthroscopy | Bunion Surgery | Cyst Removal | Flatfoot Correction | Hammertoe Surgery | Heel Surgery | Metatarsal Surgery | Nerve Surgery (Neuroma) | Toe Surgery

Therapies

Athlete's Foot Treatment | Cryotherapy | Extracorporeal Shock Wave | Iontophoresis | Physical Therapy | Neurolysis

Fitness and Your Feet

General Information About FitnessAerobics and Your Feet | Exercise Those Toes! | Aerobics | Fitness And Your Feet | Stretching | Walking and Your Feet | Feet | Work Footwear

Sports and Your Feet

Baseball | Basketball | Cycling | Golf | Jogging and Running | Tennis

Foot Care

Basic Foot Care Guidelines | Athletic Foot Care | Blisters | Children's FeetCorns and Calluses |Diabetic Foot CareExercise Those Toes! | Foot Care For Seniors | Foot Self-Exam | Pedicures | Your Feet at Work | Bunion Prevention | Burning Feet | Ingrown Nails | Nutrition For Your Feet

Women's Feet

High Heels | Stockings? | Pregnancy | Women Over 65

Foot Odor and Smelly Feet

Prevention | Treating Foot Odor

Shoes

Anatomy of a ShoeAthletic Shoe GuidelinesChildren's Shoes | Corrective and Prescription Shoes | What to Look FoWhat To Look For| Getting a Proper Fit | Men's Shoes | Women's Shoes | Your Footprint | Wear Patterns

Links

 

 

 


A large part of the attraction of golf is the time spent outdoors. During an 18-hole round of golf, the typical player walks four-to-five miles over the course of three-to-five hours. That's a lot of time spent on your feet. At the same time, the biomechanics of golf make your feet as important to the success of your swing as any other part of the body. Getting and keeping your feet in the right position to help carry the force of the swing through properly can be impacted by the shoes you wear.

Common foot injuries and problems associated with golf are related to overdoing it, particularly if an underlying structural problem exists in your feet. This includes tendonitis, capsulitis, and ligament sprains and pulls, which can keep a golf enthusiast off the green. Improper shoes can bring on blisters, neuromas, and other pain in the feet. Podiatrists see these problems daily and can treat them conservatively to allow for a quick return to the sport.

 

Golf Shoes

Remember that you'll spend a lot of time on your feet standing and walking during golf, so look for shoes that are comfortable. Golf shoes come in a variety of types, from the traditional oxford-style to sandals and even boots. Whichever style you choose, look for shoes that are lightweight, well-cushioned in the soles and heels, made from a breathable material, water resistant and offer traction. The middle of the shoe should feel a little tighter than your everyday shoes to support your swing. Be sure to try on golf shoes with the socks you will normally wear to make sure to get the right fit.

More serious golfers may be interested in purchasing spikes. Just give yourself time to adjust to walking wearing spikes and make sure you know the policy for wearing them on each golf course. Spikes give added traction and help stabilize the foot during play. Spikes are made from different materials. Soft, polyurethane spikes that are less damaging to the green and lightweight, but don't offer as much traction as a heavier material. Carbide or ceramic spikes are for serious golfers who spend a lot of time on the greens. They are made of durable materials that often outlast the shoe's upper. Metal spikes often last the life of the shoe, are very durable, give good traction but must be carefully maintained to prevent rust.