Our team of specialists and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you. Or, for a more comprehensive search of our entire Web site, enter your term(s) in the search bar provided.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.


 


 

What is a Podiatrist?

When To Call a Doctor

Foot Anatomy

Foot Problems

General Statistics

Achilles Problems

Achilles Tendonitis |Peroneal Tendon Dislocation/Dysfunction | Xanthomas of the Achilles Tendon

Ankle Problems

Ankle SprainChronic Lateral Ankle Pain | Osteochondritis

Arch and Ball Problems

CapsulitisFlat Feet Metatarsalgia (foot pain in ball)Plantar Fibromas (lumps in the arch of the foot) | Sesamoiditis

Common Foot Injuries

Ankle Sprain Injuries | Broken Ankle | Fractures | Osteochondritis (stiff ankle)Osteochondromas |Shin Splints | Sports Injuries

Deformities

Amniotic Band Syndrome | Bunions | Claw ToeClubfootDysplasia (Epiphysealis Hemimelica) | Enchondroma | Flat FeetGordon Syndrome | Haglund's Deformity | Hallux Limitus (Stiff Big Toe Joint)Hallux Rigidus (Stiff Big Toe) | Hallux VarusHammertoesJackson-Weiss SyndromeMallet ToesMetatarsalgia |Osteomyelitis (Bone Infections)Overlapping or Underlapping ToesPeroneal Tendon Dislocation/DysfunctionPosterior Tibial Tendon DysfunctionSesamoiditisSpurs | Tarsal Coalition

Diabetes and Your Feet

Diseases of the Foot

Arthritis | Cancer | Charcot Foot | Freiberg's Disease | Gout | Kaposi's Sarcoma | Kohler's Disease | Maffucci's SyndromeOllier's DiseaseRaynaud's Disease | Seiver's Disease

Fungus Problems

Common Fungal Problems | Athlete's Foot (Tinea Pedis) | Fungal Nails

Heel Problems

Haglund's Deformity | Heel Callus | Heel Fissures | Plantar Fasciitis (heel spur)

Nail Problems

Black Toenails | Ingrown Toenails| Nail Fungus

Skin Problems

Allergies | Athlete's Foot (tinea pedis) | Blisters| Burning Feet | Calluses | Corns | Cysts | Frostbite | Fungus | Gangrene | Lesions | Psoriasis | Smelly Feet and Foot Odor | Swelling | Ulcers | Warts

Toe Problems

Bunions | Claw Toe | Digital Deformity | Hallux Limitus (stiff big toe joint)Hallux Rigidis (rigid big toe)Hallux Varus | Hammertoes | Intoeing | Overlapping, Underlapping Toes | Subungal Exotosis (bone spur under toenail) | Turf Toe

Vascular/Nerve Problems

Acrocyanosis | Alcoholic Neuropathy | Chilblains (cold feet) | Erythromelalgia | Ischemic Foot | Neuroma | Spasms | Venous Stasis

 

 

Overview of Foot and Ankle Problems

Basic Foot Care Guidelines

Medical Care

Diagnostic Procedures

Computed Tomography | MRI | Ultrasound | X-Rays

Orthotics

Pain Management

General Information and Tips | Pain Management for Specific Conditions

Surgical Procedures

General Information | Achilles Surgery | Ankle Surgery | Arthritis Surgery | Arthroscopy | Bunion Surgery | Cyst Removal | Flatfoot Correction | Hammertoe Surgery | Heel Surgery | Metatarsal Surgery | Nerve Surgery (Neuroma) | Toe Surgery

Therapies

Athlete's Foot Treatment | Cryotherapy | Extracorporeal Shock Wave | Iontophoresis | Physical Therapy | Neurolysis

Fitness and Your Feet

General Information About FitnessAerobics and Your Feet | Exercise Those Toes! | Aerobics | Fitness And Your Feet | Stretching | Walking and Your Feet | Feet | Work Footwear

Sports and Your Feet

Baseball | Basketball | Cycling | Golf | Jogging and Running | Tennis

Foot Care

Basic Foot Care Guidelines | Athletic Foot Care | Blisters | Children's FeetCorns and Calluses |Diabetic Foot CareExercise Those Toes! | Foot Care For Seniors | Foot Self-Exam | Pedicures | Your Feet at Work | Bunion Prevention | Burning Feet | Ingrown Nails | Nutrition For Your Feet

Women's Feet

High Heels | Stockings? | Pregnancy | Women Over 65

Foot Odor and Smelly Feet

Prevention | Treating Foot Odor

Shoes

Anatomy of a ShoeAthletic Shoe GuidelinesChildren's Shoes | Corrective and Prescription Shoes | What to Look FoWhat To Look For| Getting a Proper Fit | Men's Shoes | Women's Shoes | Your Footprint | Wear Patterns

Links

 

 

 


Proper footwear is an important part of an overall treatment program for people with diabetes, even at the earliest stages of the disease. If there is any evidence of neuropathy, wearing the right footwear is crucial.

As a general rule, people with diabetes should choose shoes that:

  • Accommodate, stabilize, and support deformities, such as Charcot Foot, loss of fatty tissue, hammertoes, and amputations. Many deformities need to be stabilized to relieve pain and avoid further damage. In addition, some deformities may need to be controlled or supported to decrease further progression of the deformity.
  • Limit motion of joints. Limiting the motion of certain joints in the foot can decrease inflammation, relieve pain, and result in a more stable and functional foot.
  • Reduce shock and shear. A reduction in the overall amount of vertical pressure, or shock, on the bottom of the foot is desirable, as well as a reduction of horizontal movement of the foot within the shoe, or shear.
  • Relieve areas of excessive pressure. Any area where there is excessive pressure on the foot can lead to skin breakdown or ulcers. Footwear should help to relieve these high pressure areas, and therefore reduce the occurrence of related problems.

Prescription Footwear

Many diabetics need special prescription footwear. The various types include:

  • Custom-made shoes. When extremely severe deformities are present, a custom-made shoe can be constructed from a cast or model of the patient's foot. With extensive modifications of in-depth shoes, even the most severe deformities can usually be accommodated.
  • External shoe modifications. In these cases, the outside of the shoe is modified in some way, such as adjusting the shape of the sole or adding shock-absorbing or stabilizing materials.
  • Healing shoes. Immediately following surgery or ulcer treatment, special shoes may be necessary before a regular shoe can be worn. These include custom sandals (open toe), heat-moldable healing shoes (closed toe), and post-operative shoes.
  • In-depth shoes. An in-depth shoe is the basis for most footwear prescriptions. It is generally an oxford-type or athletic shoe with an additional 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch of depth throughout the shoe. This extra volume accommodates inserts, or orthotics, as well as deformities commonly associated with a diabetic foot. In-depth shoes are usually designed to be light in weight, have shock-absorbing soles, and come in a wide range of shapes and sizes to accommodate virtually any foot.
  • Orthoses or shoe inserts. Also known as orthotics, an orthosis is a removable insole which provides pressure relief and shock absorption. Both pre-made and custom-made orthotics or shoe inserts are commonly recommended for patients with diabetes, including a special total contact orthosis, which is made from a model of the patient's foot and offers a high level of comfort and pressure relief.